Mary Astor Blogathon: Dodsworth (1936)

Note:  This post is part of the Mary Astor Blogathon hosted by Silver Screenings and Tales of the Easily Distracted.

Dodsworth (1936)

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What are you after?

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“I’m out to make a new life for myself, I’m out to learn how to enjoy my leisure now that I’ve retired, I’ve been doing things that people expected of me always  I want to feel free, I want to sit under a linden tree with nothing more important to worry about than the temperature of the beer.  If there is anything more important.”  –Samuel Dodsworth

“I’m out to make a new life for myself, I’m out to learn how to enjoy my leisure now that I’ve retired, I’ve been doing things that people expected of me always I want to feel free, I want to sit under a linden tree with nothing more important to worry about than the temperature of the beer. If there is anything more important.” –Samuel Dodsworth

Recently retired, auto executive Samuel Dodsworth (Walter Huston) takes a final opportunity to survey the automobile plant that has been his life for the past twenty years.  He was the founder and president of Dodsworth Motors and is now retiring and at last taking time to see what can do for him.  Part of this new phase in life includes his younger wife Fran (Ruth Chatterton).  Fran sees the selling of the company as a new-found freedom.  She has been jealous of Sam who (in her mind at least) has been able to escape the boredom of their home in Zenith by going to the plant each day.  Fran has felt tied down to their life in Zenith, and is bored with the same people and activities.  Their daughter is on her honeymoon with her new husband, and the new empty-nesters are eagerly preparing for a trip abroad to Europe.

“I’m out to see some of the world I haven’t seen and get a perspective on the USA.  Why I might get to know myself at the same time.  I might even get to know my wife.”  –Samuel Dodsworth

“I’m out to see some of the world I haven’t seen and get a perspective on the USA. Why I might get to know myself at the same time. I might even get to know my wife.” –Samuel Dodsworth

“I guess I’m just a woman who lives in Italy.”  -Edith

“I guess I’m just a woman who lives in Italy.” -Edith

From the onset of the voyage Sam is interested in exploration and adventure, he is exuberant at the thought of learning and seeing new things and often forgets his place and manners.  Director William Wyler often shows Sam as looking out, heading out, on the go and eager.  He may pause to look back occasionally but decisively he moves forward.  Sam looks outward seeking new opportunities that peak his interest.  Fran on the other hand is concerned with appearances.  She often criticizes Sam or comments to others about his common mannerisms and snickers at the bourgeois American “tourists” on the ship.  Traveling to Europe is only the first part of their adventure, and it is on this leg of the journey that Sam will first meet the beautiful and sensitive expatriate, Edith Cortright (Mary Astor).  Edith shares Sam’s frank nature and simple ideas, and seems immediately taken with Sam.

My dear don’t

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“I’m poor in so many ways, so many.”  -Fran

“I’m poor in so many ways, so many.” -Fran

Unlike Sam, Fran does not enjoy the typical tourist activities on the ship and in Europe.  It is on this trip that we begin to see Fran’s true self as a narcissistic snob.  She begins to create a new circle of friends for herself of Europeans that she finds are cultured, educated, and refined; everything she views Sam not to be.  Fran also finds excitement in the new-found attention from other men.  Sam will later excuse Fran’s behavior as a fear of getting older (i.e. Fran’s having a mid-life crises).  Despite her behavior, Wyler was able to create some audience sympathy with the character of Fran, truly you do not want to complete hate her.  Fran’s venture outside of the bounds of her marriage begins with an on board flirtation with Captain Clyde Lockert (David Niven).  However, Fran is surprised when what she sees as a flirtation leads to Lockert making an attempt to take things further.  She rebuffs his attentions and is humiliated when Lockert points out he only acted on what was expected of him in the situation and leaves her with a warning not to start things she is not prepared to finish.  But as the trip moves along, Fran will continue to start things, and her reactions towards affairs outside of her marriage will change along with her growing narcissism.  Though she had refused the advances of Lockert, she does not refuse the advances of Arnold Iselin (Paul Lukas) a European businessman who she met through one of her new European friends.  Fran invites Iselin to a small birthday dinner with a few other friends.  While people are beginning to leave, Iselin lingers speaking to Fran.  Edith walks in on them together and simply tells Fran “don’t.”

You ought to be smart enough not to care what people think.

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Fran: “No woman enjoys getting to be 35” Edith: “When you’re my age you’ll look back on 35 as a most agreeable time of life, Mrs. Dodsworth.” Fran: “I hope I look as young as you do…when I’m your age” Edith: “You’re almost sure to my dear.”

Fran: “No woman enjoys getting to be 35”
Edith: “When you’re my age you’ll look back on 35 as a most agreeable time of life, Mrs. Dodsworth.”
Fran: “I hope I look as young as you do…when I’m your age”
Edith: “You’re almost sure to my dear.”

That night in the hotel Fran pleads with Sam to return to Zenith and she will remain in Europe alone for the summer.  According to Fran, Sam is racing towards old age and she needs to be able to live.  As much as Sam would like to believe that this separation is only temporary and is only to allow Fran some space to be her own person, Fran has changed.  She transforms to who she needs to be for this new crowd, to be what she feels she was destined to be.  Fran makes herself out to be younger and continuously reminds Sam that she was young when he married her as if to convince herself that she can be young again under the right circumstances.  Her new friends know little (if not anything) about her life in Zenith, including her grown daughter that lives in Zenith.  In contrasts, Edith, embraces her age (to note in real life, Mary Astor was 30 when she played the character of Edith) and does what is comfortable for her.  She makes no excuses for the way she lives, for example telling Sam that the reason she lives in Italy is because it’s cheap.  We would never find Fran making a statement like that, and in fact, if she cannot use Sam’s money she has some money of her own.  Fran continuously criticizes Sam for maintaining his same routines and manners, and not assimilating into European culture.

“Have you ever noticed how transparent people are when you really look at them.” –Sam Dodsworth

“Have you ever noticed how transparent people are when you really look at them.” –Sam Dodsworth

“If things got this bad, they’ve got to stop all together.”  –Sam Dodsworth

“If things got this bad, they’ve got to stop all together.” –Sam Dodsworth

Sam will leave Fran alone in Europe, and she will begin an affair with Iselin.  Sam will confront Fran about the affair.  But, Fran is not prepared to leave Sam.  There is a rainbow on the horizon for this couple.  However, finding out that her daughter Emily is expecting a child, sends Fran further over the edge.  Though she is with Sam she is frequently spending time with a European associate of his, Baron Kurt Von Obersdorf (Gregory Gaye).  It is her relationship with Kurt and the prospect of marrying him, which finally resolves Fran to leave Sam.

Drifting isn’t nearly so pleasant as it looks.

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“We, Sam, we?”  -Edith

“We, Sam, we?” -Edith

However, till the divorce is finalized Sam must remain in Europe.  He now travels Europe alone, finding it difficult to find the same joy in the adventure that he had before.  While in Italy, he reconnects with Edith.  Sam had commented to Edith at the beginning of the trip that he only planned on staying abroad for about six months, after that he would homesick.  This trip appears to have well reached past the point of Sam’s amusement.  Recognizing his loneliness Edith invites him to stay with her.  At the villa we see Sam flourishing again, without him realizing it he and Edith have falling in love.  They have begun to build a new life and make new plans for the future.  But Edith worries that someday Sam may fall back into Fran’s trap.

The old triangle stuff.

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“Kurt asked for permission to marry me?”  -Fran

“Kurt asked for permission to marry me?” -Fran

Sam had commented during the Arnold Iselin affair about “the old triangle stuff,” and now Sam is involved in a triangle of his own.  Fran with her admires created most of the emotional triangles in the film.  There are not only script triangles, director William Wyler places the scenes where the characters are in this literal-physical triangle, typically with Fran playing a role.  However, reviewing this marriage it is safe to say that even before the trip, there were three in the marriage, Sam, Fran and the business.  With the business out of the picture, it is necessary for something to be between them, least they have to face each other.  Sam is often the out-of-place piece in the trip, where Fran was the third wheel in Zenith.  But even when Sam returns alone to Zentih he is still the third wheel despite being in his own home.  His daughter and new husband are now living in the home, while waiting for their home to be built.  Sam’s son-in-law has now taken over many of the household duties and luxuries that were normally reserved for him, this includes the key to liquor cabinet and receiving of telegrams.  Sam doesn’t appear to find his place again till he reconnects with Edith.  Fran on the other hand, even with Sam gone is still involved in triangles, this time with Kurt and his mother the Baroness (Maria Ouspenskaya would win an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her brief, yet memorable role as the Baroness).

That marriage is working out alright.

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“Loves got to stop somewhere short of suicide.” –Sam Dodsworth

This film can be seen as a study in marriage.  Simplistically, we see the ending of a marriage and the beginning of a new one.  There is a wife in the middle of a mid-life crisis, and a husband who is embracing his new roles in life.  We also see their daughter, recently married and beginning a new family with her husband.  They are so dreamy-eyed and full of possibility it makes us hope that the turmoil in the Dodsworth marriage will not be a reflection on her and her husband.

 

 

 

Would you like to enjoy life for a while?

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“It’s giving you up that hurts.”  –Sam Dodsworth

“It’s giving you up that hurts.” –Sam Dodsworth

It is really hard for me to stop there without going on and telling you the end of the movie.  I will just leave you wondering what Sam’s future will be, whether it be with Fran or Edith.

But, before I end, something must be said for the partnership of director William Wyler and producer Sam Goldwyn.  Dodsworth would earn a Best Picture nomination, and Wyler would win his first Best Director Academy Award for this film.  Besides Dodsworth, they would partner on two other films Barbary Coast (1935) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946).  Not having seen Barbary Coast I cannot really comment on it.  However, for the many that have seen The Best Years of Our Lives and enjoy Wyler and Goldwyn’s storytelling and respect for characters and their development and changes in a film will enjoy Dodsworth.  The dialogue of the characters is what shows the audience who they are, their motivations, and their flaws.  It even helps the audience find some sympathy for the most unsympathetic characters (i.e. Fran Dodsworth).  Mary Astor had said that the character of Edith Cortright was one of her favorite characters.  At the time this film was in production, Astor was in the middle of a nasty divorce.  She credits Edith as her inspiration for her demonstration of strength and determination during the trial.  On a final note, Walter Huston originated the role of Samuel Dodsworth initially on Broadway in the stage production of Dodsworth.  He would reprise the role in the Lux Radio Theater broadcast on October 4, 1937.

Images from: Dodsworth. Dir. William Wyler.  Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1936.  DVD.

This post is featured as a contribution to the Mary Astor Blogathon as part of the eight day celebration of Mary Astor’s Birthday.  Click here to check out some other great contributions and tributes to this blogathon.

This post is featured as a contribution to the Mary Astor Blogathon as part of the eight-day celebration of Mary Astor’s Birthday. Click here to check out some other great contributions and tributes to this blogathon.

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13 thoughts on “Mary Astor Blogathon: Dodsworth (1936)

  1. silverscreenings May 6, 2013 at 6:03 am Reply

    Excellent review – and great screen caps, too! I like how you called this film an analysis of marriage. I’ve never thought about it that way before.

    I also like that you didn’t give away the ending.

    Thanks for participating in our blogathon! :)

    • epclassicmovienight May 6, 2013 at 9:07 am Reply

      Thank you. Like “The Best Years of Our Lives”, each time I see “Dodsworth” I discover something new. And I’m not sure if the credit is Goldwyn, Wyler, or the combination of both. But, really both movies are about relationships and changing/growing. It’s pretty interesting the similarities between the two movies and the story telling.

  2. [...] Classic Movie Night [...]

  3. [...] Classic Movie Night [...]

  4. KimWilson May 6, 2013 at 1:45 pm Reply

    It appears that you and I chose the same film for the Blogathon. I wish Astor were in Dodsworth much more than she is. I must disagree with your statement regarding feeling sorry for the most unsympathetic character (Fran). I felt none whatsoever toward her.

    • epclassicmovienight May 6, 2013 at 3:05 pm Reply

      I do agree, we need more Mary Astor in the film. I do feel sympathy for Fran, she is a tragic figure who will create (and did create) her own dimise. But, I most definatly would have rebelled against this movie if the ending did not turn out the way it had.

  5. Movies, Silently May 6, 2013 at 2:07 pm Reply

    Thanks for the detailed review! I really enjoyed reading about the characters and performances, as well as your thoughtful analysis. Good choice of images as well.

    • epclassicmovienight May 6, 2013 at 3:02 pm Reply

      Thanks and thank you for replying back to me yesterday. I’m going to have to try that program you suggested.

  6. Patti May 6, 2013 at 6:12 pm Reply

    I caught this movie for the first time about 2 months ago. I quite liked it. It was my first exposure to Ruth Chatterton. Prior to this film, the only thing I knew about her was that she was once married to George Brent.

    I thought Walter Huston was terrific…and Mary never looked more lovely.

  7. Aubyn Eli May 7, 2013 at 7:38 pm Reply

    I can see why Edith was one of Astor’s favorite roles. She’s the kind of person we all want to be. Mature, sympathetic, enjoys her life, and doesn’t pretend anything. I love her dialogue with Fran, where Edith manages to be tactful and yet still lets Fran know that she sees right through her.

  8. Judy May 10, 2013 at 1:47 pm Reply

    It’s fascinating to see the different takes on the same movies that this blogathon has produced. I really like your comment:” However, reviewing this marriage it is safe to say that even before the trip, there were three in the marriage, Sam, Fran and the business” – there is definitely a feeling that back in America she was the one to be neglected, and now to some extent she is taking a revenge, though she ends up hurting herself just as much as Sam. Must agree that Astor is great in the screen time she gets.

  9. lassothemovies May 11, 2013 at 1:08 pm Reply

    Great post on a movie that I really love. I didn’t realize how popular this title would be for the blogathon, but it is nice to read a post on it from someone who enjoyed the film as much as I do. Thanks again!

  10. […] the birthday of Maria Ouspenskaya, TCM will be spending the morning featuring several of her films: Dodsworth (1936) at 6:30AM (ET) Judge Hardy and Son (1939) at 8:15AM (ET) The Mortal Storm (1940) at 10:00AM […]

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